Learning How to Focus

This time around I focused on adjusting the aperture of my camera. By using a wide aperture, which uses a small f-stop (like f/3.5), you can create bokeh, or background blur, to the images. Then I contrasted those images with photographs that used a small aperture which has a high f-stop (like f/22) to keep all of the images clear from the front to the back.

With that being said, let’s review how my time taking these images went.

Wide Aperture

As you can see in the photo below, I started with a basic photo of my nephew. I had a wide aperture at a f/3.5 which cause him and his blankets to be sharp while the background was blurred. This is a subtle example, but because of the contrast, my nephew is emphasized as the subject.

Sleeping Lad: 10/9/2018 9:00 am, Rexburg, ID; FL 18 mm; f/3.5; .3 sec; Nikon D3200;

The second image I shifted to outside with some fake flowers and the difference is stark. The thing to remember is that the farther the background objects are from your subject the more blurred they will be. The orange flower contrasting with the cold colors of the background. While the first image was shot from above, this second one was shot from below so the background could be used more effectively.

Orange Flower: 10/8/2018 4:13 pm, Rexburg, ID; FL 18 mm; f/3.5; 1/4000 sec; Nikon D3200;

Small Aperture

These next two images were taken with a small aperture so that the objects in the foreground and background are both sharp. This is usually for more scenic shots. So rather than having a subject like the other photos, these two are more scenes.

This first image shows this by capturing the leaves in the front of the image. As well as the information board and clouds in the background. We don’t have the bokeh effect in this image.

Walkway in Afternoon: 10/3/2018 2:53 pm, Rexburg, ID; FL 55 mm; f/22; 1/60 sec; Nikon D3200;

This last image also was captured with a small aperture of f/22. When you use this f-stop, you can capture sun flares. That’s what happened with this image. The front and back of this image are sharp in focus.

Spori in Afternoon: 10/3/2018 2:45 pm, Rexburg, ID; FL 18 mm; f/22; 1/200 sec; Nikon D3200;

7 thoughts on “Learning How to Focus

  1. I really liked your pictures That you took. The sun flair is awesome. I have been trying to do that so it was helpful to look at your camera settings. I loved the flower and the background. I felt like it had good color.
    I have a lot of flower shots on my blog if you would like to look, https://breannarogersbyui.wordpress.com/category/comm-300/
    Also Sara had some cool examples of nature as well that might help you with some ideas for the next project.
    https://sarahreedsite.wordpress.com/category/digital-imaging/

    Like

    1. I love your pictures Seth, they are creative and especially the baby is so adorable. I also love the Spori image where the sun is coming and you block it from your camera genius! Overall it is great explanations and great fall pictures along with this adorable baby. I am excited to see more pictures from you.
      Here is my blog:
      https://janeprefumo.wordpress.com/category/photography/
      Here is Stephan Laird blog:
      https://lairdmediasite.wordpress.com/2018/10/10/woah-thats-deep/

      Like

      1. I love your pictures Seth, they are creative and especially the baby is so adorable. I also love the Spori image where the sun is coming and you block it from your camera genius! Overall it is great explanations and great fall pictures along with this adorable baby. I am excited to see more pictures from you.
        Here is my blog:
        https://janeprefumo.wordpress.com/category/photography/
        Here is Stephan Laird blog:
        https://lairdmediasite.wordpress.com/2018/10/10/woah-thats-deep/

        Like

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